One Fine Day

One Fine Day

by Nonny Hogrogian
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Paperback(Reprint)

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Overview

One Fine Day by Nonny Hogrogian

Awarded the Caldecott Medal for the most distinguished picture book of 1971
"One fine day a fox traveled through the great forest. When he reached the other side he was very thirsty." The jaunty red fox stole milk from an old farm woman, lost his tail under the annoyed woman's knife, and spent the day bargaining to get it back. This humorous retelling of a favorite Armenian folktale is a story small children will follow and "read along" with ease.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780020436201
Publisher: Aladdin
Publication date: 09/28/1974
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 32
Sales rank: 487,295
Product dimensions: 10.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.20(d)
Lexile: AD1080L (what's this?)
Age Range: 5 - 8 Years

About the Author

Nonny Hogrogian is a two-time winner of the Caldecott Medal, first for Always Room for One More (1966), and second for One Fine Day (1972). She also received a Caldecott Honor for The Contest (1974). Her husband, poet David Kherdian, received a Newbery Honor for The Road from Home: The Story of an Armenian Girl (1979). They live in Florence, Massachusetts.

Nonny Hogrogian is a two-time winner of the Caldecott Medal, first for Always Room for One More (1966), and second for One Fine Day (1972). She also received a Caldecott Honor for The Contest (1974). Her husband, poet David Kherdian, received a Newbery Honor for The Road from Home: The Story of an Armenian Girl (1979). They live in Florence, Massachusetts.

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One Fine Day 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
One Fine Day by Nonny Hogrogian tells the story of a fox's dilemma to get his tail back from the old lady whose milk he drank. As the story progresses, the fox goes to one thing to another to ask for something to give to the previous thing in order to repay the old lady back with some milk. I guess she was too lazy to milk the dumb cow herself. I believe One Fine Day teaches that there are consequences for doing something wrong. In this case, the fox stole the old woman's milk, and in return, she cut off his tail. To gain his tail back, he had to replace the milk he stole from the old woman. At the same time, this book also teaches the principle of giving out of the goodness of your heart such as the last character, the old man with the grain, did. With him, the mad cycle stopped and the fox was then able to exchange with each of the things and finally got the milk from the cow to give to the old woman to sew his tail back on. I would consider One Fine Day to be a combination of a cumulative structure and repetitive structure since it continued in a series of payments as the fox goes to one thing to another to exchange for something they each want so he can obtain some milk so the old lady will sew his tail back on for him. In other words, the list continued to add up and grow as the story progressed in a cumulative fashion but was repetitive at the same time. I really enjoyed reading this book. I can see why it won the Caldecott Award. One Fine Day is such a fine read!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book won the Caldecott Medal as the best illustrated children's story of 1971. The vivid colors will brighten your day! The story itself is a retelling of an Armenian folk tale. The book is exceptional for the fable, the moral it tells, and the dynamic illustrations that turn the fox's frustration into an adventure for the reader. 'One fine day a fox traveled through a great forest. When he reached the other side he was very thirsty.' 'He saw a pail of milk that an old woman had set down while she gathered wood for her fire.' 'Before she noticed the fox, he had lapped up most of the milk.' 'The woman became so angry that she grabbed her knife and chopped off his tail . . . .' Thus, the story begins. The fox begs for the old woman to sew his tail back on. Otherwise, 'all my friends will laugh at me.' ''Give me back my milk,' she said, 'and I'll give you back your tail.'' The fox finds a cow who is willing to help, but wants grass in return. The fox asks a field for some grass, and the field asks for some water. The fox goes to the stream, which tells him to get a jug for the water. From there, the fox finds a fair maiden who has a jug, but wants a blue bead. The fox finds a peddler who has a blue bead, but wants an egg. An hen offers an egg in exchange for some grain. The fox finds a miller who has grain. 'The miller was a good man and felt sorry for the fox.' With the grain given to him by the miller, the fox proceeds to do all of his barters. In the end, the old woman 'carefully sewed his tail in place, and off he ran to join his friends . . . .' As you can see, the language is simple so you will find this book helpful in assisting your child to learn to read around ages 4-6. The illustrations carefully match the words, which will help remind your child which words are on the page. The book is valuable for introducing a number of important themes. For example, if you do something wrong, people will be angry. They may even punish you in some way. Further, most people want something in exchange even if they are willing to help. Beyond that, even those who want to help may not be able to (the stream could not transport the water it would give freely). Most importantly, without the kindness of a stranger (the miller) the fox would have been out of luck . . . even with all of his efforts. After you finish the story, I suggest that you also ask your child what lessons are here. Children are famous for spotting unintended ones as well as fundamental truths that adults easily overlook. Have a great discussion! Seek balance in all that you do, especially when you redress an imbalance . . . whether caused by you or others! Don't forget to play the role of the miller! Donald Mitchell, co-author of the Irresistible Growth Enterprise and The 2,000 Percent Solution
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is about a fox that travels through a great forest and is very thirsty when he gets to the other side and finds some milk, so he steals the milk from an old lady on a farm, and she cuts his tail off. And the fox spends a day trying to get it sewn back on. He encounters many obstacles trying to get his tail sewn back on. Read this book to find out if he got his tail back on and his thirst quenched. Hogrogian, Nonny. One Fine Day. New York: Aladden Books 1971.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Hogrogian, Nonny . One Fine Day. New York: Aladden Books 1971. One Fine Day is adapted from an old Armenian folk tale. It is the story of a thirsty fox who steals some milk and looses his tail in the process. He encounters many obstacles on his quest to get his tail back. Each obstacle the fox encounters gives the fox a new request such as, ¿Bring me a jug,¿ or ¿Pay me an egg.¿ Read this charming tale to find out if the fox is able to quench his thirst. Nonny Hogrogian was born on May 7, 1932 in New York City. As she grew up she was encouraged to explore her artistic abilities. Her mother, father, and sister were artistic. Hogrogian worked as a designer and production assistant at Thomas Y. Crowell in the children¿s literature department. She illustrated her first book, King of the Kerry Fair in 1960. Hogrogian is an award-winning illustrator of over fifty children¿s books from New York. She illustrates many Armenian fairy tales books. She has won Caldecott medals twice, once in 1966 and 1972.