Pawn

Pawn

by Aimée Carter
4.0 33

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Pawn 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 33 reviews.
DiiMI More than 1 year ago
Would you give up your life and your identity to save those you care about? In a dystopian America where a power-hungry dynasty dictates what your station in life will be, seventeen year old Kitty, one of society’s “throw away” children, is thrown into a twisted plot to cover up the death of the “first” daughter. Bought on the black market, drugged and unconscious, Kitty wakes up to find the girl she has seen in the mirror for her entire life is gone, replaced by the face, body and voice of another and blackmailed into pretending to be Lila, the popular daughter of Daxton Harte, America’s leader. Kitty soon learns there is more to the death of Lila than meets the eye, and that Harte is actually a puppet for the family matriarch. She will do anything to keep those she loves safe, but soon finds that there is a grassroots rebellion in the making and just maybe members of this completely dysfunctional family may be its greatest supporters and allies. Can Kitty perform well enough to fool those around her? Can she fool the public? With so many lives on the line, she cannot fail, but as the Harte family’s house of smoke and mirrors starts to crumble from within, the secrets that are revealed threaten to overwhelm the resourceful young girl from the streets. Pawn by Aimee Carter will rock you back on your heels with its fresh and intriguing plot that contains elements of surprise, mystery, political intrigue, terror and even romance! This is brilliant story-telling, fast-paced, unrelenting in its magnetic pull and a tremendously strong base to build what promises to be an incredible series! When Ms. Carter allowed Kitty to tell this story from her own perspective, it was a stroke of creative genius, putting the reader right in the middle of the action. Each character is unveiled slowly, their forms colored in and their personalities crammed with three-dimensional life! All along the way, there are twists, turns and knots to be unraveled, but never did the pace relent! I absolutely NEED to know what will happen next! I received an ARC edition from Harlequin Teen in exchange for my honest review.
majibookshelf More than 1 year ago
Pawn was such a disappointment. There I said it. I was really.. and I mean really looking forward to it because the synopsis promised a comeback for the dystopians with an actual dystopian plot line. Unfortunately the lack of likability in all of the characters as well as the absurdity with the way they behave and what is the norm for them kind of ticked me off. Maybe I should explain what I mean by what I wrote above. The main protagonist, Kitty, is a Doe (her last name, like Jane Doe given to all unidentified corpses), meaning an orphan. Her only way of going up the social and life ladder is to ace the test every 17 (or 16?) year old has to take. Unfortunately Kitty gets a III.. which is a far cry from the royal VII as well as the desired V or even IV. Now she has to work in the sewers.. all the way in Nevada.. so what does she decide? oh.. just work at a prostitution house for 4 months until her boyfriend takes his test.. la di la di la.. oh so normal.. WHAT?! HOLD UP! I am at AWE at how NORMAL it is for this girl to decide to work as a prostitute and all her boyfriend say is 'I promise I'll get a VI and get you out of there'… say what? also.. some scenes in which people go 'hunting' but instead of hunting animals they hunt people who have ben exiled.. and when Kitty finds that out she's horrified for a couple of paragraphs.. then BACK TO NORMAL.. Another horrifying point is when someone she knew for a long time dies because of Kitty and the next couple of pages were dedicated to Kitty JUSTIFYING that it is for the best and that person really was in the wrong place at the wrong time. Just… the logic and lack of humanity in ALL the characters, the supposed good and evil is INFURIATING. I really couldn't stomach all characters and I really disliked every single one of them. Other than that, I felt that the plot line was wasted in terms of plain obvious revelations occurring in the book that just felt a bit too unrealistic. I had high hopes in regards to the dystopian side of the novel, and while I do like the incorporation of rebellion, I just can't understand some of the dynamic that are present in the novel. So many disconnected things happen in this novel that I wished were linked in a better way. The book felt choppy and I honestly started skimming paragraphs towards the end because I started getting restless (Reminded me of my restlessness when I read The Diviners). Unfortunately I am not going to be reading the sequel, because this whole book was a huge disappointment.  
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was very excited to read this book and very disappointed! The characters are not developed at all! I never fell for the heroine, she would act sarcastic once and others defined her as having spunk; however, she was meek and unexciting the entire novel. The relationships between characters was lacking as well, the book basically announces people as friends, and then they make large decisions based on the friendship that the reader doesn't even believe in. The plot was inconsistent, the characters were immensely underdeveloped and the "twists and turns" of the book fe lt like the storyline was being made up as it was going along.
aleahpastorino More than 1 year ago
I devoured this book within two days of it being out. I have always loved Aimee Carter's writing and read her books many times over. Pawn was no disappointment. Completely different, but important, tone from her other series. The characters will enamore you as will the dystopian world they live in. Absolutely loved it. Can't wait for the next one.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fascinating book about a dystopian America.
ReadingGrrl More than 1 year ago
I didn't know what to expect with this book, but it was surprisingly addictive. Much like the society in the Divergent series by Veronica Roth at the age of 17 all citizens must go through a testing process that will rank them. Conspiracies abound in this novel and you really have a hard time figuring out who Kitty can trust and who she can't. Its a chess game to stay alive and Kitty is a pawn, can she make it to the end of the game or will she be killed before it ends?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
KatsNook More than 1 year ago
Pawn is the first book I’ve read from author Aimee Carter and it had a great start but I became frustrated with the story. What did I like? From the start the writing drew me in to the story. There is no slow build-up and we jump right into the story. The social class system was similar to The Selection series (which I really liked) so it made it easier to follow the story. The masking (surgical alteration) of Kitty into Lila was different and added a disturbing twist to the story. With most YA Dystopian series there is the love triangle but I didn’t find that in Pawn. It was nice change to have this aspect missing from the story. Kitty is in love with her boyfriend Benjy but as Lila she must pretend to be engaged to Knox. Kitty is focused on what she’s asked to do so she is not attracted to Knox. And Knox feels the same way towards her. The lack of a love triangle felt right since the main plot is a revolution, so this was a good decision by the author. Pawn has a nice variety of characters. The main character Kitty Doe is smart and loyal to her adopted family. She is willing to sacrifice her happiness to make sure her boyfriend Benjy has a better life. Even though she has no choice but to do what the Harts tell her she still showed some courage to say what she felt. The evil characters of Augusta and Daxton were so well written that there were times I hated them but also understood why they made their choices. What didn’t I like? Even though the class system was familiar to me I still needed more world building. It was never clear of what happened to the society of today and how the Harts came to power. It would have been nice to have a quick prologue to establish the setting so readers would have a better understanding of this world. I also felt that there were too many twists in the story for a first book. Just when I thought I was at the perfect spot for the book to end the story would continue on a different path. Some of the scenes felt rushed and I didn’t get a true understanding of what was going on. As much as I liked Kitty her decisions just bothered me. She’s willing to sacrifice herself for people who truly don’t care about her. By the end of this book I would have hoped she would stop allowing herself to be used but this didn’t happen. It was very frustrating to see her not take the opportunities to be independent and gain her freedom. Overall I thought Pawn was good but it could have been better. I do want to read the next book to find out what happens. I liked the author’s writing so I look forward to reading her other books.
Readergirl_Revus More than 1 year ago
This book took me on a very big ride.  Let me start out by saying that I became a fan of Aimee Carter with her Matched series, so I was eagerly anticipating this new series beginning.  Plus I love dystopians.  When I finished reading this story, I felt sort of exhausted.  Now, let me explain. Some few issues I had with the story were 1) This government ranking system has, in one form or another, been done quite a bit in other dystopian stories, including in Aimee Carter's other dystopian trilogy itself.  Although I have to admit that the author made something completely different out of it so that the ranking part was important and central to the actions being taken, but at the same time not so overdone as to overwhelm the plot.  2) This book had an "Elsewhere", which at least one other very famous novel called The Giver had.  Aimee's Matched series had an Elsewhere of sorts also, although it wasn't called Elsewhere in that trilogy.  So these three Elsewheres from these books may be operated differently, but fundamentally, they are meant for the same purpose.  So we have some elements here that weren't very original in this dystopian society's worldbuilding. Surprisingly, the book had a much smaller cast than I'm used to in a dystopian, as most of the story and action centers around the Hart family who are the ruling government in this society.  This was the deciding factor as to whether or not I received any enjoyment from the book.  On the one hand, there were several characters in the cast who were somewhat cliched...i.e...the two main villains, and to a smaller extent, "the boyfriend" who was very unoriginal in my view and didn't really offer anything to the story other than to be the catalyst used to yank Kitty around by the nose.  I didn't buy that romance at all for some reason... I just didn't feel it.  Thankfully, however, two characters saved it all for me.  Kitty herself, who has undergone the change to become Lila, and Knox, the man engaged to the now replaced Lila.   I loved Kitty because of her strength of character, and her complete willingness to throw her own life away bravely in order to save someone else.  She is faced with so many choices in this book and does what she has to do in order to protect people she cares about.  She's tough, strong, and determined.  Knox was a winner to me for many reasons, some I can't even define yet.  He was quietly brave, trustworthy, very smart, had compassion, but was also very mysterious.  I found myself really wishing for him to be the love interest, but at this point, I can't really tell if this is going to be a triangle or not.  I'm usually against a triangle, unless it's very well executed, but I'm almost hoping for one here, just because I loved this character so much and think these two would be perfect together. As far as the story itself goes...I'll have to use the same word again...exhausting.  There was so much plotting, moving, counter-moving, grouping, and re-grouping going on in this story that at times I felt like I was being pulled around by my hair in a whirlwind.  It definitely made for a non-predictable book, but when I finished the last sentence of the book, I felt like I'd spent a week on the rack with all of my limbs being pulled in different directions.  In a way, this was very good, but at times I felt it became excessive. I know this is a very mixed review and I seem to not be coming down with either a thumbs up or down, but on the whole, I did enjoy the book enough to want to see how this turns out.  I love the author, and I'm going to stick with it for sure.  Her writing is very engaging, as always.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Captivating read that grabs you and doesn't turn you loose till 3am. Full of exciting twists and turns that keep you riveted till the very end.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Read this book in one day! Time well spent.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I really loved this book! So freaking good! Go read this! if you don't, I have no idea what your doing with your life! GO my lovelies! FLY! It was so good!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I found this book vary refreshing. I new take on the typical Distopian YA fiction. If you like Distopian for sure read it. If you don't then maybe just try the free sample and go from there. I just purchased the 2nd book and I am looking forward to see how it goes. And don't worry I was turned off at the beginning by the leading lady s first name (sounds like a stripper name) but I got over it by the 3rd chapter.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
preppea More than 1 year ago
Exciting, Well-Told, Multidimensional In the spirit of Divergent and The Selection comes PAWN, a young adult dystopian novel about a merit-based society caused by overpopulation. Kitty Doe grew up in a group home after her family was forced to give her up because they’d gone over their one child mandate. At 17, she is given a test that will determine her future place in society. Though she’s extremely smart and can memorize almost anything if given the opportunity, dyslexia causes her to perform poorly on the test and she is given a sewer worker job and forced to move far away from the love of her life, Benjy. When she acts out in a moment of anger over her newly realized destiny, she is exposed to a whole new world of trouble. Daxton Hart is the prime minister of the meritocracy and just so happens to need someone with Kitty’s unique physical attributes. He masks her into a replica of his recently murdered niece in an attempt to quiet those who hope to cause an uprising. With little choice in the matter, Kitty is suddenly thrust into the highest class of society when she is turned into Lila Hart. Taught by those closest to Lila, Kitty learns exactly how Lila acted and what motivated her in life. As Kitty tries to survive in this new role, she realizes no one she loves is safe as the Harts will use anyone she cares about to force her into submission. I was instantly caught up in PAWN’s world and the characters that brought it to life. The story is well-told, multidimensional and instantly appealing to anyone who loves the young adult dystopian genre. I would have liked a little more depth on the motivation of the characters—what compelled and inspired them, what made Celia or Knox want to fight for the Blackcoats, what drove the masked Daxton to the choices he made. Near the end I felt like the story lost a touch of it’s authenticity in its attempt to throw so many unexpected twists and revelations at the reader but not enough to keep me from wanting to jump right into the sequel. PAWN was exciting and kept me on the edge of my seat and I can’t wait to see what happens to Kitty, Benjy, Knox, and Greyson in CAPTIVE. If you love young adult dystopian novels even a fraction as much as I do then you should definitely give PAWN a try. **Complimentary copy provided by the author/publisher for an honest review.
danibookworm91 More than 1 year ago
From the description of this book, I felt like I wasn’t really going to like it. I put off reading it for a long time, as I was worried it just wouldn’t hold me interest. There is a lot of dystopian in the YA market now a days, and some of it just doesn’t click. However, Pawn clicked for me.  Aimee Carter did an excellent job establishing the world of Pawn. As it is a dystopian, it takes place in a futuristic United States, one that is a distorted version of our current country. The world building did not drag the beginning of the book down like it does in other books of this genre. The world was fully developed, and I found even a scarily possible future for the United States. Each person in society is assigned a number based on how they score on their test; this number determines a persons future. Kitty scores a III, a lower number than expected, which threatens her entire plans for the future. When faced with the possibility to escape from the ranks of the III and be elevated to a VII, the highest rank in the country, Kitty jumps at the opportunity without understanding the consequences. The main character, Kitty is forced to become Lila Hart after her death. Little does Kitty realize that becoming Lila, becoming a VII, does not make life easier. The Hart family, the leaders of the United States, are a very screwed up family. Corruption, lies, rebellions and secrets are abound, and Kitty is thrust into the middle of a power struggle. Little does Kitty know just how important she is to the Harts as Lila. This screwed up family and political atmosphere had me hooked. I needed to see how all the pieces were going to fall and wanted all the lies unraveled.  I really enjoyed that throughout the book, Kitty stayed true to herself despite being forced to assume the identity of someone else. While Kitty could have accepted the fact that her life was no longer her own, but instead she stayed true to who she was. Her determination and strength shone through her new exterior as Lila. Kitty could have been followed the instructions given to her by Daxton, Celia, or Augusta, but instead she took charge; she refused to become a pawn to either side. While her life was no longer her own, she still found ways to make decisions for herself despite her circumstances. She made me root for her. I had a few issues with the characterizations of some secondary characters, but I will be interested to see how all the characters develop and grow as the series continues. The romance in the book also felt a bit stale to me, probably because I did not have any connection to Benjy, a character I wished was a bit more fleshed out.  Pawn was fast paced, filled with twist and turns. The web of lies and deceptions is a messy one, but one that I wanted to get untangled, and Aimee Carter does a good job with revealing the truth throughout the book. The ending was heart-pounding, leaving Kitty in an even more precarious position than I thought possible. I cannot wait to see what other secrets will be revealed in the coming books. Thoroughly engaging and engrossing, with lies and secrets galore, Pawn is a great new start to a new series and I look forward to seeing what Aimee Carter plans to do with the rest of the series. 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved it but be warned its very sad
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
pagese More than 1 year ago
I was a little on the fence about this one. Since it seemed to fall smack into the new "it" genre, I was a little wary on reading it. But, I like the author's first series, so I decided to give it a shot. I was intrigued with the idea of someone talking over the life of another. First, the complications of performing the vast amount of surgeries needed to make Kitty look exactly like Lila was mind blowing. But the thing that tripped me was they could even make Kitty sound exactly like Lilly, but kept her eyes? The exact reason why she was chosen to replace Lila was because she had the exact same color eyes. Well it's a damn good things she chose to steal something that day to get notices by the soldiers. How else would they have kept the public from knowing Lila was dead? Kitty takes her new life in stride, but its a very fine line she walks. The Prime Minster has some conditions to her new found status. Lila's mother and fiancee seem to have a different agenda entirely. But, how can she be sure they truly believe in the cause they want her to support? And how can the so callously gamble with her life? They know she's not the real Lila. And they know exactly what the Prime Minister has threatened to do should she choose to continue along the path that Lila had choosen. It's interesting watching Kitty learn who Lila really was. She may have been born a VII, with all the wealth and privileges that go along with it. But Lila saw something in the change she was tying to push forward. Kitty must decide if that rebellion is worth her life. Interestingly enough, she has the most experience with the people Lila was trying to inspire. Perhaps that will help her in her decisions. Can her effect on people cause and effect on herself? I liked some of the relationship dynamic building in this series. Kitty's relationship with Lila's mother is interesting. I can't quite get a read on her. The Prime Minister and the matriarchal mother often left me wondering who was really ruling this country. And, I was actually enjoying the build up of a love triangle. Maybe because I'm sure if it's suppose to be one? I'll be looking for the next book in this series. There are some serious plot twists that leave me wondering were we go from here!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is probably one of the better books I've read in a while. I feel like it was similar to The Hunger Games, but it was a copycat book. The idea was original and engaging. I wouldn't call it a page turner must it was very well written and deserves high regard. I would recommend this book to a teen between 13-16. I as a 14 year old enjoyed the book, but there was some content that wouldn't be appropriate for people under 13. Can't wait for the next book :)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Personally, I expected more from Ms. Carter. The Goddess Test Series was utterly fantastic, and this one was somewhat... disappointing. All in all, it was very interesting, just not as grabbing as I first expected when I picked it up. It's a good read if you just want to pass the time, but nothing worth spending too much time on.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago