Rachel Ray: (English Edition)

Rachel Ray: (English Edition)

by Anthony Trollope
3.4 5

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Overview

Rachel Ray: (English Edition) by Anthony Trollope

Rachel Ray is an 1863 novel by Anthony Trollope. It recounts the story of a young woman who is forced to give up her fiancé because of baseless suspicions directed toward him by the members of her community, including her sister and the pastors of the two churches attended by her sister and mother.

The novel was originally commissioned for Good Words, a popular magazine directed at pious Protestant readers. However, the magazine's editor, upon reading the galley proofs, concluded that the negative portrayals of the Low church and Evangelical characters would anger and alienate much of his readership. The novel was never published in serial form.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781548053314
Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date: 06/11/2017
Pages: 194
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 1.25(h) x 9.00(d)

About the Author

Anthony Trollope (1815-1882) was one of the most successful, prolific, and respected English novelists of the Victorian era. Some of his best-known books collectively comprise the Chronicles of Barsetshire series, which revolves around the imaginary county of Barsetshire and includes the books The Warden, Barchester Towers, Doctor Thorne, and others. Trollope wrote nearly 50 novels in all, in addition to short stories, essays, and plays.

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Rachel Ray 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was hard o understand.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Martha3 More than 1 year ago
Because of typos and spelling variations throughout the book, it may be hard to follow. But overall, it was interesting and enjoyable. I would recommend for the patient reader. I would equate to "Little Women."