Restoration (Rai-kirah Series #3)

Restoration (Rai-kirah Series #3)

by Carol Berg

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780451458902
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 08/06/2002
Series: Rai-kirah Series , #3
Pages: 480
Sales rank: 760,876
Product dimensions: 4.20(w) x 6.70(h) x 1.00(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Though Colorado is home, Carol Berg's roots are in Texas, in a family of teachers, musicians, and railroad men. She has degrees in mathematics from Rice University and computer science from the University of Colorado, but managed to squeeze in minors in English and art history along the way. She has combined a career as a software engineer with her writing, while also raising three sons. She lives with her husband at the foot of the Colorado mountains.

Table of Contents

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Restoration (Rai-kirah Series #3) 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 25 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The first two books were outstanding but this last one is not quite satisfying. The book keeps you suspended for most of it. In fact, I could hardly put it down but the ending was just blaise. The solution of a well thought out story was very flat. Hopefully, the next book will redeem the author.
surreality on LibraryThing 10 months ago
Plot: In an improvement over Revelation, we have an actual plot. Unfortunately, the action takes place in a small side plot, while the main storyline is about the central character's navel-gazing and angsting. The ending disappoints - too many of the promised and hinted-at solutions don't happen.Characters: It's rare to find a central character elsewhere who manages to be this uninteresting. Far too much internal worrying, not nearly enough actual action. The side characters are left to carry the plot, but they get so little attention that they can't pull it off.Plus: It's better than Revelation. More Aleksandr.Minus: Two thirds of the story are occupied by an absolutely unappealing and boring character. Summary: This is one of those series endings where you're grateful it's finally over.
starstorm on LibraryThing 10 months ago
Restoration completes the Rai-Kirah trilogy and brings together Seyonne and Aleksander once more. Both of them disgraced and exiled from their own people, this arc of the story continues to develop their characters as they grow through adversity (misery builds character, after all! :) and ultimately discover and accept their destinies. A truly satisfying conclusion that is bittersweet only in the knowledge that it's the last book in the series. As a side note, the novella "Unmasking" in Elemental Magic is a prequel of sorts, giving us a wonderful little glimpse into the lives of Seyonne's parents when they first meet.
MuseofIre on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I have very mixed feelings about this conclusion to the Rai-Kirah trilogy. Berg's prose is as well-crafted as ever, and I enjoyed the first half very much, but as soon as Seyonne meets the prisoner of Tyrrad Nor, it begins to drag. Almost nothing went the way I expected it to; that's not necessarily a bad thing, but I didn't think the author's choices were the most satisfying. I was puzzled by Seyonne's course of action, annoyed that it took him such an unconscionable amount of time to seek crucial information, and disappointed that he wasn't strong enough to offer Nyel the healing he planned (in fact, he didn't even really try). I was also saddened by the fate of the rai-kirah. Nor did I think that Alecsander achieved the glorious gods-touched future Seyonne envisioned for him. The one small satisfaction is that Ysanne conveniently died, leaving Seyonne free to find a more worthy woman (although I still think it should have been Fiona).
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book brings the series to a worthy conclusion. Although a mite too far into the fantastical, the writing is still interesting, the characters remain multifaceted and the author touches on the meme 'absolute power corrupts absolutely.' There is some background given on all the characters and a few new ones enter the picture with just as much color as the main actors. I recommend it.
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PhoenixFalls More than 1 year ago
This concluding novel in Berg's Rai-Kirah trilogy was better than the second volume, but still didn't quite live up to the promise in the first. The bones of a brilliant epic jutted throughout the novel, but somehow that epic never quite took shape. The novel felt pulled in too many directions. There are multiple conflicts going on throughout -- mundane civil war in the Derzhi Empire, supernatural war with the rai-kirah, and conflicts with the gods -- but rather than building on each other, these conflicts seemed to be distractions to each other. I always wanted to be following the action somewhere else, to the detriment of the action I was reading at the moment. The characters, too, fell just a bit short. The first novel lived and died by the characterization of Seyonne and Aleksander, and for the most part it lived. But by this third novel there is a large cast of ancillary characters, and all of them were never more than shadows. I could see that they were fascinating, complex people, and their complexity drove the story at all points, but I never felt any connection to them, so their motivations were at times obscure and their pain never connected with me. Even the characterization of Seyonne and Aleksander suffered in this novel. The first novel was about those two men learning to trust each other despite having absolutely no reason in the world to have that trust, but somehow in this novel that trust appeared lost. Neither man ever stopped a moment to tell the other what was going through his head, and that was the basis for far too many conflicts. I realize that the silent, brooding hero is a revered fantasy trope, but I have always been of the opinion that the charming, communicative man would get far more done. Still, despite all those frustrations, I was moved fairly quickly through this novel, and the scope was certainly large enough to satisfy. The world is fundamentally reshaped in this novel, and that is something you always want to see in a good fantasy epic. I have some other minor quibbles: Berg still struggles with pacing, and given what we discover about the gods I was left with quite a few questions about where prophecies come from, but for the most part anyone who has read the first two novels in this series should definitely read the third.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I thought the beginning was a bit borish, but really, it was the foundation for the book. It was so good it made me cry!!! Well, sometimes i do cry over books. (But not Often!!!) It was amazing, and it was a perfect ending to the first two. I really hope she writes more of these rai-kirah books, cuz they are wonderful!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This number 3 in her trilogy and she has maintained the same high standards all the way through! I found this so good, that I managed to read it in one day. I am looking forward to more from her!