Shop Class as Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work

Shop Class as Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work

by Matthew B. Crawford
3.5 24

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Shop Class as Soulcraft 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 24 reviews.
NJMetal More than 1 year ago
I preform physical blue collar mechanical related labor for a living so I figured I would readily identify with this book. What I did not realize was how deeply steeped in philosophy this book really is. This book takes deeper philosophical journies into basic values and principals of hands-on physical labor to attempt to demonstrate their inherint value over more information based office enviroment type labor. The arguments are well made and studiously supported with citations. However the deeper philosophical explorations are where the book really loses me. Granted, that is where most philosophy related book lose me. I won't hold it against the author. I did find that the conclusion were still very opinionated despite the well supported arguments. I was still not convinced that being a motorcycle mechanic was any more gratifing to the soul then an environmental think tank consultant. It still comes down to point of view, even if the author held a first hand knowedge of both points of view. If you like book like Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance then you may well like this. But if that type of book is not your cup of tea this certainly won't be either
cjhTX More than 1 year ago
It has many good ideas but is not well constructed in terms of readability. I had to push myself to finish the book because I felt I had gotten the message early on and continuing to read left little to be gained as it did not entertain me. The message that the value of 'hands-on, physically productive' work is generally not appreciated in our society is valid. Yet, according to the author, in its many forms, it commands a generous income and leaves the producer with a sense of inner satisfaction not found in much of the corporate world where shuffling papers, attending meetings, etc. leaves little real sense of accomplishment/satisfaction. The author's supposition that there will be an increasing need for people who 'fix things' or do the other mundane tasks that keep our cultural substructure going resonates while there is an increasing push by parents that their children attend college to learn to do more 'meaningful' work. College may not be the best choice for everyone.
Meshugenah More than 1 year ago
I expected a lot more of this book. I'm one of those well-educated people who also ditched the corporate world and executive positions to do something where my head and hands worked together. However, I found the author's perspective to be arrogant and pedantic, patronizing and, frankly, oftentimes juvenile. As a philosophical treatise this book is sabotaged by the elements of political diatribe. I would not recommend it to anyone.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Half smart. Well researched. Guy is clearly worried about his manliness and the over compensation makes this a tedious read. Probably best to choose one of his sources e.g. Mike Rose's Minds at Work and read that instead.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very insightful. I love how this guy (A Motorcycle Repair Man/Writer) approached his career choices. I will want my kids to go to college and all that, but I'll definately keep some of these insights in mind when advising them.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
SportCoach More than 1 year ago
In some ways this is an extension of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance but only in concept. This book will make you think. It's written with complex sentence structure. Likely can help parents direct kids in choosing satisfying, good work.
JohnK1 More than 1 year ago
This was an ok book, but it could have been written better. The first few chapters were very interesting and enjoyable to reed. The author went on to tell us how blue color work is undervalued and miss under stood in todays society. But after that, the book becomes very dry and some what hard to reed. I began to loose interest and decided to stop reading it all together. Over all, I would recommend a different book if you are interested in reading about the values of blue caller work.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As an aircraft mech. it made me reevaluate what I do and how I do it. Currently my work place is starting a CI culture and this book has made me take a closer look at that program
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