Stop Acting Rich: ...And Start Living Like A Real Millionaire

Stop Acting Rich: ...And Start Living Like A Real Millionaire

by Thomas J. Stanley

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781118011577
Publisher: Wiley
Publication date: 07/12/2011
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 288
Sales rank: 146,121
Product dimensions: 5.60(w) x 8.70(h) x 1.00(d)

About the Author

Thomas J. Stanley is the bestselling author—with over four million copies in print—of The Millionaire Mind and The Millionaire Next Door. The recognized authority on the lifestyles and behaviors of the affluent, Dr. Stanley is frequently quoted in the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Forbes, Fortune, Time, Money magazine, U.S. News & World Report, Reader's Digest, and USA Today. He has appeared numerous times on the Today show, 20/20, and The Oprah Winfrey Show.
Visit Dr. Stanley at www.thomasjstanley.com.

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Table of Contents

List of Tables ix

Preface xi

Chapter 1 The Difference between Being Rich and Acting Rich 1

Chapter 2 Everything You Think about Rich Is Wrong 33

Chapter 3 Do the Shoes Make the Man? 59

Chapter 4 Brother, Do You Have the Time? 83

Chapter 5 Keeping Up with Your Spirits 115

Chapter 6 The Grapes of Wrath 145

Chapter 7 The Road to Happiness 171

Chapter 8 Getting Out of the Poorhouse 209

Chapter 9 All that Glitters Is Not the Millionaire’s Goal 235

Appendix A The Nationwide Search for Millionaires 245

Appendix B The Millionaire Profi le 247

Notes 251

Acknowledgments 257

About the Author 259

Index 261

Customer Reviews

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Stop Acting Rich 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 27 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
First the negative. This book has too many redundant examples to support his theories and these examples are littered haphazardly throughout the book in an unorganized and excessive fashion. He does a great job supporting these theories with solid initial examples which by themselves sufficed to prove his points. He jokes about this redundancy in the book, to his credit. Second negative. Based on the redundancy mentioned above, this work could have been shorter, perhaps by 50%. A shorter version would have made the work stronger in my opinion. Third negative. If you have read his Millionaire Next Door, Dr Stanley reuses many of the same concepts, and brings little new insight here. Positives: The author seems to be harboring a chip on his shoulder about the some of the cohorts he writes about in the book. He writes quite venomously about wine collectors, as if he had one or two in his mind that seemed to get under his skin, and uses this book as a forum to rip into them. Maybe deservedly so. Very entertaining stuff. More positives: I like Dr. Stanley. Very entertaining. A few new insights on the wealthy, that he hadnt written about in the Millionaire Next Door, that made the price of the book worth it to me. I have been recommending the this book to everyone, because it has substance, as a read that comes AFTER his Millionaire Next Door.
kristenn on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a decent update of the earlier books. It was published after the housing and stock markets started crashing and periodically touches on that as a warning. (Although it's pretty strange that a 2009 author would consider a cellphone a luxury item like he still does.) This edition probably wouldn't be very helpful by itself as it doesn't go back and repeat the basics in the original volume. Like the first book, it does get redundant. But that's not such a bad thing in this context. The basic goal is to get people to reconsider their need for particular luxury items and everyone has a different trigger. So by having a chapter each for cars, watches, vodka, wine, etc., then everyone is covered. And you can just skim -- or even skip -- the chapters discussing items you don't overspend on. He does customize each product. You don't see the same argument against each luxury good. I did quibble with how he only looks at the relative performance of luxury cars and completely ignores the value of aesthetics.His examples are still almost exclusively 50-65 year old men, but part of that is to explain how they got where they are so that younger people today can end up there too. Plenty of people who are wealthy in their 30s and 40s turn around and lose it all, so there are arguments against including them in the case studies. He has also written a book specifically about women and money, which I haven't read. But I wasn't impressed that one of his examples of how women are naturally more frugal than men (?!) was that they spend less on average per pair of shoes. Completely ignoring the angle of how *many* pairs they're buying relative to men.It also bothered me a little that he regularly referred back to his original book and its success without ever mentioning his co-author on it, who was not involved in this one.
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risuena More than 1 year ago
So similiar to The Millionaire Next Door, 3 1/2 stars. I would have given this 4 stars, but if you've read his other book, like what other reviewers thought, it rehashed same things but not quite as good. It got to be a little boring with very little new material. What it is good for is a reminder to look towards a more secure financial situation; that can be obtained with various habits, hard work, and discipline, not to mention the courage to go against the crowd. It gives what's worked for people and what have been others' mistakes. It's a good book to start you off thinking about financial independence, what's important in life, and your happiness. I agree with another review that this should be read after The Millionaire Next Door.
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