Sybil, Or, The Two Nations

Sybil, Or, The Two Nations

by Beaconsfield Benjamin Disraeli

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Overview

Sybil, Or, The Two Nations by Beaconsfield Benjamin Disraeli

Sybil, or The Two Nations is one of the finest novels to depict the social problems of class-ridden Victorian England. The book's publication in 1845 created a sensation, for its immediacy and readability brought the plight of the working classes sharply to the attention of the reading public. The 'two nations' of the alternative title are the rich and poor, so disparate in their opportunities and living conditions, and so hostile to each other. that they seem almost to belong to different countries. The gulf between them is given a poignant focus by the central romantic plot concerning the love of Charles Egremont, a member of the landlord class, for Sybil, the poor daughter of a militant Chartist leader.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781727769586
Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date: 10/07/2018
Pages: 314
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.66(d)

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Sybil; Or, The Two Nations 1.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
anijizmejian More than 1 year ago
Benjamin Disraeli writes, “There are three types of lies -- lies, damn lies, and statistics.” In Sybil, Disraeli attempts to explain the struggle of the Victorian working class. He spends a great deal of time justifying himself which is boring to read. The story itself is told by an obvious elitist masquerading as suffragette. Though it has many quotable sentences, I did not enjoy this book in its entirety.    
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have never read a worse book! It is dull and filled with political jargon of the era that is incomprehensible today. The love story between Egremont and Sybil is barely visible and understandable. I would reccomend that you pick up another book as soon as possible.