The Seventh Sense: Power, Fortune, and Survival in the Age of Networks

The Seventh Sense: Power, Fortune, and Survival in the Age of Networks

by Joshua Cooper Ramo

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780316285070
Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
Publication date: 04/03/2018
Pages: 352
Sales rank: 398,995
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.25(h) x 1.00(d)

About the Author

Joshua Cooper Ramo is the author of the international bestseller The Age of the Unthinkable. He is co-chief executive officer and vice chairman of Kissinger Associates and a member of the board of directors of FedEx and Starbucks. His first book, No Visible Horizon, chronicled his experiences as a competitive aerobatic pilot.

Table of Contents

Preface 3

Part 1 The Nature of Our Age

In which the revolutionary character of our era is explained. The need for a new instinct is introduced. The historical stakes are weighed.

Chapter 1 The Masters 7

Chapter 2 The Age of Network Power 31

Chapter 3 War, Peace, Networks 58

Part 2 The Seventh Sense

In which we regard the world with a new sensibility. Connection, we discover, changes the nature of an object.

Chapter 4 The Jaws of Connection 95

Chapter 5 Fishnet 125

Chapter 6 Warez Dudes 144

Chapter 7 The New Caste 172

Chapter 8 "MapReduce": The Compression of Space and Time 188

Part 3 Gateland

A guide to power in the world that becomes newly apparent with the Seventh Sense.

Chapter 9 Inside and Out 225

Chapter 10 Hard Gatekeeping 250

Chapter 11 Citizens! 276

Acknowledgments 309

Notes 313

Index 333

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The Seventh Sense: Power, Fortune, and Survival in the Age of Networks 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Was narrated well
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Horrible read.
Lemaire More than 1 year ago
This book takes a refreshing and large-scale look at the way the web is reshaping our world. It discloses the way that connecting things by networks changes the nature of those things — banking for instance. The author, Ramo, is hampered at times by the myopia of a right-wing ideologue. Don't forget he worked for the Kissinger Associates think tank. Case in point, in Chapter II, 'The Age of Network Power', his discussion of the 2008-2009 financial meltdown. In Part 3 of this chapter, he ignores the insights of Paul Krugman: the need for increasing demand through real infrastructure spending. That is, for economic stimulus. He awkwardly dances around that idea even as he notes correctly that trickle-down supply-side economics did not work. Then in Ramo's discussion of Austrian economist Friedrich Hayek in Chap. II part 6. Hayek told about the dichotomy between personnal autonomy and the power of the market versus the tyranny of central government planning. Influenced by the rise of facism he witnessed in 1938 Europe. Hayak and Ramo completely miss the role of the commons, and the successful way Western Europe today has combined personal autonomy with a large government function. Other than these objections, this is a brilliant book. It details the ways that the web now pervades our world. It explains the way connection changes the character of the things being connected. Large-scale, web pervades the way the world works. The author gives a brief history of the web's origins in the RAND corporation. And says that in the future, the web will be even more pervasive.
mspec More than 1 year ago
The Seventh Sense addresses the fourth phase of the American narrative, power and broader strokes of global order using a bit of history, philosophy, national security and Silicon Valley, a mix not solely relegated to business or how-to but an authentic survey of the world around usa nd the sense needed to master it. The book properly equips readers to address the challenges of ISIS, the opportunities of AI, the power of stateless currencies like Bitcoin and the forces of ideologues like Donald Trump, all with a dose of creative prose and vignettes from a global career. The Seventh Sense represents the critical framework for leaders to make sense of and shape their work to a rapidly evolving world. The book uncovers, moves between, makes relevant and elevates new and familiar voices in fresh ways– Master Nan, AT&T's Paul Baran, Thomas Jefferson, Occupy Wall St.; Ramo's insights, particularly the New Caste and the constructs of Hard Gatekeeping, have the potential to become lingua franca for public intellectuals, explained with a deftness of prose that draws upon Ramo's years as a journalist navigating some of the most complex issues of our time. Ramo doesn't overly fetishize technology and the future – he provides ample areas of caution – and most importantly identifies original opportunities within and beyond the networks these machines connect. There is a thoroughness here that others in this category lack – and I imagine this book will become one that business leaders and political mavens to explain this era, as it will for me.