This Is How You Lose Her

This Is How You Lose Her

by Junot Díaz
3.5 119

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Overview

This Is How You Lose Her by Junot Díaz

Pulitzer Prize-winner Junot Díaz’s first book, Drown, established him as a major new writer with “the dispassionate eye of a journalist and the tongue of a poet” (Newsweek). His first novel, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, was named #1 Fiction Book of the Year” by Time magazine and spent more than 100 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list, establishing itself – with more than a million copies in print – as a modern classic. In addition to the Pulitzer, Díaz has won a host of major awards and prizes, including the National Book Critic’s Circle Award, the PEN/Malamud Award, the PEN/O. Henry Prize, the Dayton Literary Peace Prize, and the Anisfield-Wolf Award.

 

Now Díaz turns his remarkable talent to the haunting, impossible power of love – obsessive love, illicit love, fading love, maternal love. On a beach in the Dominican Republic, a doomed relationship flounders. In the heat of a hospital laundry room in New Jersey, a woman does her lover’s washing and thinks about his wife. In Boston, a man buys his love child, his only son, a first baseball bat and glove. At the heart of these stories is the irrepressible, irresistible Yunior, a young hardhead whose longing for love is equaled only by his recklessness—and by the extraordinary women he loves and loses: artistic Alma; the aging Miss Lora; Magdalena, who thinks all Dominican men are cheaters; and the love of his life, whose heartbreak ultimately becomes his own. In prose that is endlessly energetic, inventive, tender, and funny, the stories in This Is How You Lose Her lay bare the infinite longing and inevitable weakness of the human heart. They remind us that passion always triumphs over experience, and that “the half-life of love is forever.”

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781594487361
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 09/11/2012
Pages: 224
Sales rank: 805,538
Product dimensions: 5.60(w) x 8.30(h) x 1.00(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

 Junot Díaz is the author of Drown and The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, which won the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Pulitzer Prize and was named Time's #1 Fiction Book of 2007. He is the recipient of a PEN/Malamud Award and the Dayton Literary Peace Prize.  Born in Santo Domingo, Díaz is a professor at MIT.

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This Is How You Lose Her 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 119 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I bought this book for a long plane ride. I love Junot Diaz, really. Like a Junot Diaz/Aaron McGruder slashfic? done. But this book just felt like there was no point. It tapered off at the end and then it was just done. It was certainly a page-turner and I enjoyed it for the duration of the trip, but I felt like it was lacking in completion somehow. For anyone contemplating this book and are wary of the reviewers who complained about the "over-use" of Dominican slang, check your white privilege at the door, please. POCs aren't writing to serve you. So, the use of Spanish is NOT particularly harmful, just as his highbrow lit references aren't meant to be alienating (I almost choked on airplane wine when I read the "she Bartlebys me" line) and even if you happen to be white, you won't feel like POCs are out having a great time without you. Unless you're just like that anyway. Really enjoyed reading this book, but I wish Diaz had delved more into intellectual discussions of his--sorry--YUNIOR's relationships. Entertaining, but I wouldn't read it again.
goodgirlheroineaddict More than 1 year ago
I bought this book because of the reviews and the catchy title. I didn't know the author. However, after reading This Is How You Lose Her, I will look for more books by this author. In a nutshell, this is an autobiography of a Dominican immigrant. It is a rags to riches, dirt poor to Ivy League professor story. Diaz tells you every sad, embarrassing detail which endears him to the reader. You follow him from elementary age immigration to the loss of his older brother - a strong influencing character - to leukemia during high school. Early disconnect from both his father, who left the family for another woman, and his brother hint at rationale for Diaz's emotional distance in future relationships. We watch him struggle to become a responsible man with no positive role models and discover quite the womanizer. The title of the book should tell you all you need to know about the results of his behaviors. He loses, over the course of his adult life several women he truly respected, possibly loved, and is left to ponder his own behavior.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a story of how you can lose everything by being completely insensitive and impulsive. How you can lose everything you think you love because you don't really know what you love. Wonderfully absorbing.
Mizmeeshell More than 1 year ago
I wish this book was longer! Junot Diaz once again intrigues the reader through various tales of lost loves in this quick read. It's raw, relatable, and impossible to put down.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I would never have finished this book if I hadn't bought it. I didn't like the characters and found it really hard to follow. If you don't know Spanish, you are in trouble as there will be a lot you can't read!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
1st book that I paid for and read. Very relatable.
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Not enough books for Latino men by Latino men in the world. This was great and I could relate with Yunior's life.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good read
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Manages to capture the male perspective about life and love.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Junot Diaz is like the NWA of literary fiction in the sense that he gives readers a chance to walk in the shoes of someone they might not ordinarily meet. I think this partly explains his popularity as writer. His voice is one we have not heard before.No one has writen about this particular community until now. And yes his characters are profane and they make immoral choices and some readers will not have the stomach for this. However I think it's important to point out that he is not glorifying their behavior; he is mourning it. The book beautifully illustrates some of the tragic aspects of latin culture in stories like Pura Principle in which every character loves someone who is cruel to them while ignoring those that really love them. I would like to say to those that complained about the untranslated Spanish: Come on people. Use context clues. It's not that hard. For me, this book was very moving. I found that I cared for these characters and felt their pain. I plan to reread this book along with Drown in which many of these characters first appeared. To find a book that is good enough to reread? To me that is the highest compliment you can give a book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved this book!