O Jerusalem!

O Jerusalem!

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Overview

O Jerusalem! by Larry Collins, Dominique Lapierre

Now a major motion picture, this remarkable classic recounts, moment by moment, the spellbinding process that gave birth to the state of Israel.

Collins and Lapierre weave a brilliant tapestry of shattered hopes, fierce pride, and breathtaking valor as the Arabs, Jews, and British collide in their fight for control of Jerusalem. O Jerusalem! meticulously re-creates this historic struggle. Collins and Lapierre penetrate the battle from the inside, exploring each party's interests, intentions, and concessions as the city of all of their dreams teeters on the brink of destruction. From the Jewish fighters and their heroic commanders to the charismatic Arab chieftain whose death in battle doomed his cause but inspired a generation of Palestinians, O Jerusalem! tells the three-dimensional story of this high-stakes, emotional conflict. Now with a new introduction by Dominique Lapierre, O Jerusalem! remains, as ever, a towering testament to the fiery dawn of Israel and an unforgettable tale of faith and violence, of betrayal and indomitable courage.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780671662417
Publisher: Simon & Schuster
Publication date: 05/15/1988
Pages: 640
Sales rank: 376,964
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.43(h) x 1.30(d)

About the Author

Larry Collins is the author of Fall from Grace, The Road to Armageddon, and coauthor, with Dominique Lapierre, of the bestselling Is Paris Burning?, Or I'll Dress You in Mourning, Freedom at Midnight, The Fifth Horseman, and Is New York Burning?, books read by millions of people in more than thirty languages. He died in 2005.

Dominique Lapierre is the author of the bestselling The City of Joy, Beyond Love, A Thousand Suns, and Five Past Midnight in Bhopal. He lives in France.

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O Jerusalem 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Having traveled to Jerusalem 23 times, I can affirm, in my opinion, that this book is the best written of all accounts of Jerusalem during this period. After five readings over 20 years, I remain convinced the balanced presentation of the beginnings of the state of Israel has not been written with more clarity and fairness to both sides. A monumental work.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Beirut768 More than 1 year ago
When Israel took over Jerusalem in 1967 many listened and watched. The first reaction of the young people in the Middle East was how could one close one's eyes to history in the making?
Many of my generation have not seen Jerusalem, the place we prayed to remain the birth of civilization rather than a symbol of new style of warmongering.

Elderly people wept, all were stupefied by the speed Jerusalem `fell' and later became interested to see how the city will be administered. Their first thoughts, though, were `thank you God there was no material damage to the old city like there had been no war'.

This book has been able to squeeze the last ounce of drama from the events that happened in this important (and holy) city and described in admirable details how Jerusalemites were resigned - more in anger than in hatred - to the inevitable.

The author is obviously enthusiastic at witnessing the transformation of the 1967 silence of death city of Jerusalem to a dynamic place starting with just another chapter in the annals of two thousand years of changing hands.
Guest More than 1 year ago
While this book presents some of the Arab perspective, ¿Jews Good, Arabs Bad¿ is perhaps a more appropriate title, for that summarizes its underlying tone. The book does not portray a realistic view of Jerusalem¿s history. Instead, it is a political book accentuates certain episodes that illustrate the Jewish connection to the city while ignoring other poignant episodes that illustrate the Arab connection. In a typical Orientalist fashion, this book portrays the Arab presence in Jerusalem in a negative light as if any and all plagues that affected the city can be attributed to the Arabs. It defines ¿progress¿ by comparing to European city models, whereas comparison of Jerusalem to its regional counterparts like Beirut or Baalbek is more appropriate. The authors could have tried harder to incorporate the Palestinian point of view. Jerusalem is a city that has a 4000-year history, is important for 3 major religions, and is inhabited by both Arabs and Jews. A real understanding of the city¿s history requires equal attention to all sides, a task that ¿Jerusalem: One City, Three Faiths¿ by Karen Armstrong accomplishes quite beautifully.
Guest More than 1 year ago
My children's piano teacher was a Roman Catholic Palestinian Arab with an Australian passport. He had been the organist at the Church of the Holy Sepulcher in Jerusalem in 1947. Each week we would ask for a story about his life as a Palestinian. When I asked what book I could suggest others read to learn about the Palestine, he suggested this book. Reading it was like reading my mother-in-laws autobiography...full of stories we had already heard.