The Color of the Sun

The Color of the Sun

by David Almond

Hardcover

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Overview

Award-winning author David Almond pens the dreamlike tale of a boy rediscovering joy and beauty within and around him, even amid sorrow.

One hot summer morning, only weeks after his father’s death, Davie steps out his front door into the familiar streets of the Tyneside town that has always been his home. But this seemingly ordinary day takes on an air of mystery and tragedy as the residents learn that a boy has been killed. Despite the threat of a murderer on the loose, Davie turns away from the gossip and sets off toward the sunlit hill above town, where the real and imaginary worlds begin to blur around him. As he winds his way up the hillside, Davie sees things that seem impossible but feel utterly right, that renew his wonder and instill him with hope. Full of the intense excitement of growing up, David Almond’s tale leaves both the reader and Davie astonished at the world and eager to explore it.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781536207859
Publisher: Candlewick Press
Publication date: 09/10/2019
Pages: 224
Sales rank: 581,071
Product dimensions: 5.20(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.90(d)
Age Range: 12 - 17 Years

About the Author

David Almond has received numerous awards, including a Hans Christian Andersen Award, a Carnegie Medal, and a Michael L. Printz Award. He is known worldwide as the author of Skellig, Clay, and many other novels and stories, including Harry Miller’s Run, illustrated by Salvatore Rubbino; The Savage, Slog’s Dad, and Mouse Bird Snake Wolf, all illustrated by Dave McKean; and My Dad’s a Birdman and The Boy Who Climbed Into the Moon, both illustrated by Polly Dunbar. David Almond lives in England.

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The Color of the Sun 2.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous 4 months ago
*Book received from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review* One hot summer morning, only weeks after his father's death, Davie steps out his front door into the familiar streets of the Tyneside town that has always been his home. But this seemingly ordinary day takes on an air of mystery and tragedy as the residents learn that a boy has been killed. Despite the threat of a murderer on the loose, Davie turns away from the gossip and sets off toward the sunlit hill above town, where the real and imaginary worlds begin to blur around him. As he winds his way up the hillside, Davie sees things that seem impossible but feel utterly right, that renew his wonder and instill him with hope. Full of the intense excitement of growing up, David Almond's tale leaves both the reader and Davie astonished at the world and eager to explore it. Unfortunately, this book was a bit of a miss for me. There really wasn't a lot of plot to follow.
tmitchmcdermid 5 months ago
The Color of the Sun by David Almond is set in the town of Tyneside, England. It takes place over the course of one day in the life of Davie, whose father recently passed away. Early in his wanderings of the day, we discover that Jimmy Killen has been murdered.. likely suspect, Zorro Craig. Davie continues to wander about town, passively searching for Zorro Craig. This is a book about loss, grief, and healing. It's a book about life and death. It's a book about love and hate and war, and how pointless the latter two really are. It brings up questions of spirituality and the afterlife, and about what place a person occupies in the world. I liked this book. I wouldn't say I was super impressed by it, though. It seems like this book tried to pack a big punch into too quickly paced a story; thus, not quite hitting the point of most significant impact. I do genuinely respect what the author was attempting, though, and appreciate that there -was- some impact. It didn't fully miss the mark, but it could've done better. I wouldn't go out of my way to recommend this to my friends, but if the description provided in the book blurb piques one's interest, I'd say go for it. It was a quick and easy read, enjoyable enough, and did make some points to make a person ponder the questions asked. Thank you to David Almond, Candlewick Press, and Netgalley for allowing me the opportunity to read this book and share my honest opinions on it. All opinions are mine alone.