The World Doesn't Require You: Stories

The World Doesn't Require You: Stories

by Rion Amilcar Scott

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Overview

Finalist • PEN / Jean Stein Book Award

Longlisted • Aspen Words Literary Prize

Best Books of the Year: Washington Post, NPR, Buzzfeed and Entropy

Best Short Story Collections of the Year: Kirkus Reviews, Library Journal, the New York Public Library, and Electric Literature

Welcome to Cross River, Maryland, where Rion Amilcar Scott creates a mythical universe peopled by some of the most memorable characters in contemporary American fiction.

Set in the mythical Cross River, Maryland, The World Doesn’t Require You heralds “a major unique literary talent” (Entertainment Weekly). Established by the leaders of America’s only successful slave revolt in the mid-nineteenth century, the town still evokes the rhythms of its founding. With lyrical prose and singular dialect, Rion Amilcar Scott pens a saga that echoes the fables carried down for generations—like the screecher birds who swoop down for their periodic sacrifice, and the water women who lure men to wet death.

Among its residents—wildly spanning decades, perspectives, and species—are David Sherman, a struggling musician who just happens to be God’s last son; Tyrone, a ruthless, yet charismatic Ph.D. candidate, whose dissertation about a childhood game ignites mayhem in the neighboring, once-segregated town of Port Yooga; and Jim, an all-too-obedient robot who obeys his Master. Culminating with an explosive novella, The World Doesn’t Require You is a “leap into a blazing new level of brilliance” (Lauren Groff) that affirms Rion Amilcar Scott as a writer whose storytelling gifts the world very much requires.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Cross River, Md., . . . one of the country’s most fascinating cities, . . . [is] home of ‘the only successful slave uprising.’ [And] it exists only in the imagination of author Rion Amilcar Scott, who returns to the fictional town in his second short story collection. . . . The book is less a collection of short stories than it is an ethereal atlas of a world that’s both wholly original and disturbingly familiar; Scott proves to be immensely talented at conjuring an alternate reality that looks like an amplified version of our own. Bizarre, tender and brilliantly imagined, The World Doesn’t Require You isn’t just one of the most inventive books of the year, it’s also one of the best.”
–Michael Schaub, NPR

“Surreal, intertextual, and darkly comical. . . . Scott writes in the tradition of George Schuyler and Ishmael Reed but with a distinctive, wry, playful voice that is wholly his own. With breathtaking cruelty and devastating humor, Scott adduces the whole world in one community.”
–Nafissa Thompson-Spires, author of Heads of the Colored People

“Rion Amilcar Scott proves himself an impressive myth-slayer and fable-maker.... The World Doesn’t Require You reminds us that having to fight racism has a strange way of distorting everything one touches. . . . With two books under his belt, Scott seems to have barely skimmed the surface of the many more characters and conflicts he could explore in Cross River.”
–Salamishah Tillet, New York Times Book Review

“[Scott] has created a fictional mini-world so detailed that, for all its surreality, you begin to feel you could draw it on a map. But what he’s also tracing here is a history of oppression—and not just in the slavery that Cross River’s 19th-century founders escaped with their successful revolt, known as the Insurrection. The persistence of racism in American culture is central, but other entrenched forms of domination are here, too: the toxic hierarchies that humans, even those fleeing their own subjugation, so dependably replicate.”
–Laura Collins-Hughes, Boston Globe

“Powerful and revelatory.”
–Erin Keane, Salon

“A bleak and beautiful collection of short stories. . . . Scott demonstrates the skill and long-range vision of a writer we need right now. The World Doesn’t Require You requires a commitment from readers, one that will be greatly repaid in literary satisfaction.”
–Emily Gray Tedrowe, USA Today

“I’ve been a fan of Rion Amilcar Scott for years, but I was astonished by The World Does Not Require You, which seems a leap into a blazing new level of brilliance: it is a wild, restless, deeply intelligent collection of stories, each of which resists and subverts the limits of categorization. What a beautiful book.”
–Lauren Groff, author of Florida

“[Scott] constantly surprises, pushing things just a little further in either direction. . . . Though God may have forsaken [these characters], Scott does not. The World Doesn’t Require You is full of horrible, ridiculous people, but it’s full of grace, too.”
–Bradley Babendir, A.V. Club

“It’s hard to think of a more original short story collection this year than this genre-agnostic one. . . . The last story, a novella about a professor slowly losing his mind, is trenchantly funny and compelling.”
–Tomi Obaro, Buzzfeed

“Scott’s prose sparkles—it’s absurdist at times, surreal, and hilarious, but it’s always profoundly affecting, an essential reminder of all the people who’ve had to construct a home for themselves in a hostile world. That they’ve done so with brilliance and grace is not because of the unfriendly people around them but in spite of them.”
–Kristin Iversen, Nylon

“Scott joins a growing tradition of African-American authors fusing the folksy dystopian humor of George Saunders with the charged satire of Ishmael Reed, and expands on it brilliantly.”
–Boris Kachka, Vulture

“You’ll no doubt find yourself highlighting passages over and over again, consistently marveling over the author’s storytelling genius (at least I did).”
–Quinn Keaney, PopSugar

“A bold new talent emerges with this boundary-shattering collection of linked stories set in fictional Cross County, Maryland, founded by the leaders of America’s only successful slave uprising. Characters range from robots to sons of God in these magical realist stories about race, religion, and violence. Think of it as Faulkner meets Asimov.”
–Adrienne Westenfeld, Esquire

The World Doesn’t Require You swallows our world and spits it back out in stories that are sometimes surreal, sometimes satirical, and sometimes science-fiction. There’s a little something for everyone in this collection, the result of Rion Amilcar Scott’s agile mind and hyper-observant eye.”
–Katie Yee, Lithub

“This book is so good. Rion Amilcar Scott doesn’t hold back or tiptoe around issues about race. He’s the most courageous writer I know, and this collection is an excellent example and significant achievement. He’s now made his mark as a force to reckon with.”
–Nicole Dennis-Benn, author of Here Comes the Sun and Patsy

“In the midst of a renaissance of African-American fiction, Scott’s stories stand at the forefront of what’s possible in this vanguard. Funny, sad, and always moving, these stories explore what it means to call a place like America home when it treats you with indifference or terror.”
–Kaitlyn Greenidge, author of We Love You, Charlie Freeman

“Mordantly bizarre and trenchantly observant, these stories stake out fresh territory in the nation’s literary landscape.”
Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“You won’t find Cross River on any map, but its people and their stories are real and solid and demand to be shared.”
–Cari Luna, author of The Revolution of Every Day

“This soaring collection firmly places Cross River within the canon of American literature and confirms Scott as one of the most unique, powerful writers of his generation. We are so lucky.”
–Randa Jarrar, author of Him, Me, Muhammad Ali

“Scott’s bold and often outlandish imagination makes for stories that may be difficult to define, but whose emotional authenticity is never once in doubt.”
Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Flat-out unputdownable. . . . With these innovative, refreshing, and altogether thrilling stories, Rion Amilcar Scott once again shows his readers that he is a blazingly original talent, a vital voice.”
–Laura van den Berg, author of The Third Hotel


“A wholly inventive, mesmerizing, genre-bending whirlwind of a book. I am utterly blown away by Rion Amilcar Scott’s boundless talent and imagination.”
–Jami Attenberg, author of All Grown Up

Publishers Weekly

★ 06/24/2019

In 11 stories and a novella, Scott returns to the setting of his debut collection, Insurrections: fictional Cross River, Md., which, in an alternate history, is the location of the only successful slave revolt in America. Most stories are set in the present day; the prose is energetic and at times humorous—often uncomfortably so—as stories interrogate racist tropes. “The Electric Joy of Service” and “Mercury in Retrograde” recast the history of master, slave, and revolt in stories about intelligent robots designed with the facial features of lawn jockeys that fail to behave as programmed. In “David Sherman, the Last Son of God,” David, the last (and least exalted) son of God, tries to redeem himself by leading a gospel band at his elder brother’s church. And in the concluding novella, “Special Topics in Loneliness Studies,” set at Cross River’s historically black Freedman’s University, the narrator plots the downfall of his departmental colleague, whose course syllabus and writing assignments grow increasingly entangled with his personal life. Throughout, the characters’ experiences contrast the relative safety of Cross River with the more hostile ground of the once-segregated towns that surround it. It’s clear, however, that threats—whether they’re siren-like water-women, academic saboteurs, or brutal family traditions—can arise anywhere. Scott’s bold and often outlandish imagination makes for stories that may be difficult to define, but whose emotional authenticity is never once in doubt. (Aug.)

Randa Jarrar

This soaring collection firmly places Cross River within the canon of American literature and confirms Scott as one of the most unique, powerful writers of his generation.
We are so lucky.

Cari Luna

Scott’s signature blend of tenderness and world-weary wise-cracking and magical realism buoys the reader with strength and a deeply intelligent hope. You won’t find Cross River on any map, but its people and their stories are real and solid and demand to be heard.

Laura van den Berg

Flat-out unputdownable. The fictional town of Cross River, MD sits at the heart of this dazzling collection—home to water-women and a wayward lecturer secretly dwelling in the basement of a university building and the last son of god, to myth and wonder and sorrow. With these innovative, refreshing, and altogether thrilling stories, Rion Amilcar Scott once again shows his readers that he is a blazingly original talent, a vital voice.

Jami Attenberg

The World Doesn't Require You is a wholly inventive, mesmerizing, genre-bending whirlwind of a book. I am utterly blown away by Rion Amilcar Scott's boundless talent and imagination.

Kaitlyn Greenidge

In the midst of a renaissance of African American fiction, Rion Amilcar Scott's stories stand at the forefront of what's possible in this vanguard. Funny, sad, and always moving, these stories explore what it means to call a place like America home when it treats you with indifference or terror. The people in these stories are unforgettable, their lives recognizable, their voices, as written by Scott, wholly original.

Nicole Dennis-Benn

Rion Amilcar Scott doesn’t hold back or tiptoe around issues about race. He’s the most courageous writer I know; and this collection is an excellent example and significant achievement. He’s now made his mark as a force to reckon with.

Nafissa Thompson-Spires

Surreal,
intertextual, and darkly comical stories... Rion Amilcar Scott writes in the tradition of George Schuyler and Ishmael Reed but with a distinctive wry,
playful voice that is wholly his own. With breathtaking cruelty and devastating humor, Scott adduces the whole world in one community.

Lauren Groff

I've been a fan of Rion Amilcar Scott's for years, but I was astonished by The World Does Not Require You, which seems a leap into a blazing new level of brilliance: it is a wild, restless, deeply intelligent collection of stories, each of which resists and subverts the limits of categorization. What a beautiful book.

Library Journal

03/01/2019

Scott follows up Insurrections, which won the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction, with another story collection set in fictional Cross River, MD, founded by the leaders of a triumphant slave revolt.

Kirkus Reviews

★ 2019-05-27
The 21st-century surge of African American voices continues with these mischievous, relentlessly inventive stories whose interweaving content swerves from down-home grit to dreamlike grotesque.

Cross River, Maryland, rural and suburban at once, exists only in the imagination of its inventor. And in his debut collection, Scott manages to make this region-of-the-mind at once familiar and mysterious, beginning with Cross River's origins as a predominantly African American community established by leaders of the only successful slave revolt—which never really happened. Nor for that matter were there ever any sightings of God doling out jelly beans at Easter time in Cross River, as chronicled in the opener, "David Sherman, the Last Son of God," whose main character is a guitar prodigy struggling through his fraught relations with local clergy and other pious folk to play the sounds only he can hear. ("God," David remembers somebody telling him, "answers all prayers and sometimes His answer is no.") In another story, Tyrone, a doctoral candidate in cultural studies at mythical Freedman's University, submits a thesis positing that the practice of knocking on strangers' doors and running away is rooted in black slave insurrection; he recruits a friend for his thesis's practical application with lamentable results. There are also a pair of science fiction stories, set in a futuristic Cross River, in which the customs—and abuses—of antebellum slavery are replicated by humans on robots and cyborgs, who, over time, resent their treatment enough to plot rebellion. And there's a novella, Special Topics in Loneliness Studies, chronicling an academic year at the aforementioned Freedman's University during which professors and students alike struggle with their deepest, darkest emotions. Even before that climactic performance, you've figured out that Cross River is meant to be a fun-house mirror sending back a distorted, disquietingly mordant reflection of African American history, both external and psychic. Somehow, paraphrasing one of Scott's characters, it all manages to sound made-up and authentic at the same time.

Mordantly bizarre and trenchantly observant, these stories stake out fresh territory in the nation's literary landscape.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781631497889
Publisher: Liveright Publishing Corporation
Publication date: 08/25/2020
Pages: 320
Sales rank: 171,227
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.30(h) x 0.90(d)

Customer Reviews