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"Evil People": A Comparative Study of Witch Hunts in Swabian Austria and the Electorate of Trier

by Johannes Dillinger, Laura Stokes (Translator)
 

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Inspired by recent efforts to understand the dynamics of the early modern witch hunt, Johannes Dillinger has produced a powerful synthesis based on careful comparisons. Narrowing his focus to two specific regions—Swabian Austria and the Electorate of Trier—he provides a nuanced explanation of how the tensions between state power and communalism determined

Overview

Inspired by recent efforts to understand the dynamics of the early modern witch hunt, Johannes Dillinger has produced a powerful synthesis based on careful comparisons. Narrowing his focus to two specific regions—Swabian Austria and the Electorate of Trier—he provides a nuanced explanation of how the tensions between state power and communalism determined the course of witch hunts that claimed over 1,300 lives in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Germany. Dillinger finds that, far from representing the centralizing aggression of emerging early states against local cultures, witch hunts were almost always driven by members of the middling and lower classes in cities and villages, and they were stopped only when early modern states acquired the power to control their localities.

Situating his study in the context of a pervasive magical worldview that embraced both orthodox Christianity and folk belief, Dillinger shows that, in some cases, witch trials themselves were used as magical instruments, designed to avert threats of impending divine wrath. "Evil People" describes a two-century evolution in which witch hunters who liberally bestowed the label "evil people" on others turned into modern images of evil themselves.

In the original German, "Evil People" won the Friedrich Spee Award as an outstanding contribution to the history of witchcraft.

Editorial Reviews

Brian Levack

In this groundbreaking comparative study of witch-hunting in two German territories Johannes Dillinger reaches novel conclusions regarding the support of local communities for the trials, the complex web of popular witch beliefs, and the role of centralized princely authority in bringing the trials to an end. The book illuminates the ‘magical world’ of early modern Germany and analyzes the forces that drove the prosecutions.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780813928067
Publisher:
University of Virginia Press
Publication date:
08/13/2009
Series:
Studies in Early Modern German History Series
Pages:
312
Product dimensions:
6.40(w) x 9.50(h) x 1.10(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are Saying About This

Brian Levack

In this groundbreaking comparative study of witch-hunting in two German territories Johannes Dillinger reaches novel conclusions regarding the support of local communities for the trials, the complex web of popular witch beliefs, and the role of centralized princely authority in bringing the trials to an end. The book illuminates the 'magical world' of early modern Germany and analyzes the forces that drove the prosecutions.(Brian Levack, author of The Witch-Hunt in Early Modern Europe)

Meet the Author

Johannes Dillinger is Senior Lecturer in Early Modern History at Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, England. Laura Stokes is Assistant Professor in the Department of History at Stanford University.

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